Monthly Archives: October 2016

Imaginary Worlds

Imaginary Worlds is a twice monthly podcast hosted by Eric Molinsky about science fiction and other fantasy genres. How we create them and why we suspend our disbelief.

It happens I so enjoyed this podcast that I started from the beginning. Work replaced my computer and I lost where I was. I ended up re-listening to several over again and still enjoyed them.

I fully expected to hit Next over and over until I was back where I left off. Instead listening over and over to the same episodes is not normal.

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From Imaginary Worlds published October 29, 2016 at 09:17AM.

Trumped Up Cards Winner

My grandmother loved games. She and I and others would play all the time. If she was bored, then her go to way to break the lull was “How about we play a game?” I inherited most of her games.

My dining room has a shelf full of them. They include the inheritance, a few I’ve had all along, and recent games I have played and really enjoyed. A couple are some that looked amazing. Trumped Up Cards is one of the last. It really was fun to play as it reflects the candidate well. AND includes sources.

Anyway, I apparently posted a photo from playing it which was picked as a winner.

I will get a free box for winning. I plan on donating that to a local game store The Rook & Pawn.

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From Trumped Up Cards Winner published October 28, 2016 at 05:53PM.

Tools Change

Doing a software inventory of what tools I use in order to migrate to a new work computer. I make a private blog post of what software, extensions, and customizations to facilitate the move. Work provides software, but I prefer different web browsers, text editors, SSH clients, etc.

I have posts from 2009, 2011, and now 2016. Comparing the three lists, some of my preferences have stayed the same over time. Some I changed each time.

Stable

  1. Music player
  2. Notepad++
  3. SSH client
  4. Tweedeck
  5. Picasa
  6. WinMerge

Evolved

  1. Web browsers
  2. Ad blocker
  3. Password manager
  4. Calendar
  5. Chat client
  6. Read later
  7. SQL editor
  8. PDF reader

I kind of wish I had tracked my most visited web sites in this way. I used to keep a web page with a bookmark to places I frequently visit. An occasional dump of the most important could be interesting for determine how my work and interests evolve over time.

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From Tools Change published October 27, 2016 at 07:37AM.

Noisy Coworkers

Working in a cube farm, my ears perked up to an NPR story about how other people are distracting.

“In general, if a sound is coming from another person, it’s much more disturbing than when it’s coming from a machine,” Alan Hedge at Cornell says, because, as social beings, humans are attuned to man-made sounds. He says overheard conversations, as well as high-pitched and intermittent noises, also draw attention away from tasks at hand.

Of course, open offices are worse. We are not there. (Yet!) And the plans for filling in more spaces are not leveraging open offices.

I have heard many of these like the coughing, sneezing, fingernail clippers, bizarre ringtones, and especially conversations. I have been the culprit for coughing, sneezing, and very loud conversations. Pretty sure I am noisier than most of those around me.

fidget_cube_midnight_grandeThe new workstation keyboards in the cubefarm are much louder than the prior ones. I can hear these when before I could not. Of course, the former coworker who brought his own Logitech to work was known for his very loud typing. I’d thought it was just him. Nope. I now know it always was the keyboard.

The Fidget Cube pictured right is designed to allow people to fidget without clicking their pens. That funny enough is not a problem I’ve had to hear.

We do so much stuff over email or tickets or chat that phone calls are not very common. If I get one, then it almost certainly is a robocall or a marketer or follow-up to post conference spam because I deleted the emails.

Great headphones are how I hide from these distractions. There are fewer and fewer places to hide from others as the organization grows.

The interesting thing is these things kill productivity. They distract us from getting work done. Though, at the same time, when I overhear a conversation that I feel the need to contribute, I have involved myself and helping resolve the situation. Maybe the coworker who left lozenges on my desk was being helpful?

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From Noisy Coworkers published October 26, 2016 at 05:17PM.

Race Is Immutable?

In the eyes of the law, your race is considered immutable because it cannot be changed from its natural state.

This made me laugh. Being mixed the perception of my race is very mutable. People often have no idea what to make of my skin color, hair, or facial features.The day-to-day decisions I make influence that perception. The day-to-day decisions I make influence what I consider myself.

Some days I consider myself more black than white. Some days I consider myself more white than black. Some days I consider myself more mixed than either. Some days I consider myself neither black nor white.

The article does address this:

Race is an elusive, fluid concept, and the courts have been manifestly reluctant to define it. What, in the end, makes a person black? The 11th Circuit wrestled with the idea in its ruling, dredging up old definitions and emerging with nothing more definitive than that “race” is nature, not nurture.

 

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From Race Is Immutable? published October 25, 2016 at 05:12PM.

Post Conference Spam

Sadly information technology conferences give our email addresses and phone numbers to the vendors who attended. That results in me getting an uptick of spam especially in the weeks after it. It is easy to tell the spam from the conference because the vendors mention the name of the conference. All the conferences do it. It is just one of those things from going to them.

One recent gem: “Sorry we missed you.” Actually, I intentionally did not visit the vendor area. I have no budget authority,  so I am pretty much wasting their time. Last year I did with an old boss and ironically used my familiarity with Desire2Learn to get him a moose doll for his son. (He’d already gotten one for his daughters but felt bad about getting a third. Family stability is more important than some extra spam.)

Technically spam is “unsolicited usually commercial e-mail sent to a large number of addresses.” This is commercial email. The number of addresses is modest so not large. But, I think where it gets interesting is whether or not it is solicited. One could make the argument that the conferences solicit the email addresses of attendees as an enticement for the vendors to attend. The quality of the vendors entices attendees. (I’m pretty sure people who care enough at all are a small proportion.)

It is tempting to ask the conference if it is possible to have the vendors mark categories of products they sell and attendees to mark what categories they are interested in hearing. Unfortunately, I would expect 93% of attendees to mark nothing as their interests to avoid getting spammed. Maybe a mitigation is say if you mark nothing, then we send you everything. (So pick your poison.)

 

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From Post Conference Spam published October 24, 2016 at 05:09PM.

Complicated Calendar

Noticed “Election Day” was in the wrong place in my work calendar. It was on November 1st when it ought to have been November 8th. This is because the date is the first Tuesday after the first Monday giving it a potential range of November 2nd through 8th.

The Microsoft Outlook / Exchange pattern for recurring dates has nothing to accommodate this. The closest pattern Outlook has is “on the first Tuesday of November” which leaves the date that occurs this year as the lone exception. Looks like it will happen again in 2022 (non-presidential) and 2044. It last happened in 1988.

I think this came from a Microsoft list of United States holidays I added. Certainly, looking at that, I have “United States” checked for the locations shown in my calendar. All the entries appear to be entered for each individual date rather than patterns set to handle regular recurring dates and just individuals for the crazy ones.

The only other calendar entry that I can think of that is so complicated is Easter. OK, actually it is far more complicated. Well, Easter is dependent on Passover. Passover depends on the full moon. And Orthodox churches have a different calculus than than Catholic/Protestant churches. Everything else is on a date or first/second/third/fourth day of week of the month. These are all easy to program with a rule.

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From Complicated Calendar published October 20, 2016 at 06:47PM.