Monthly Archives: March 2012

Weekly Round Up Mar 16, 2012

  • The Value in Wowing Your Customers – ‘What distinguishes Chick-fil-A and Rackspace is that both companies have created what might be called a “Golden Rule” culture. Employees treat customers as they would like to be treated if they were in the customers’ shoes.’
    • I do have to admit, companies who treat me personally well earn my loyalty. If I am treated as just another faceless customer, then I tend to get bored and treat them as just another faceless company.
  • I Didn’t Tell Facebook I’m Engaged, So Why Is It Asking About My Fiancé?
    • An interesting look at what analytics can get those who have the data.

from Rants, Raves, and Rhetoric v4

TED Tuesdays

As I watch TED talks, the ones I wish to share will be scheduled to post here on Tuesdays. This has been happening the past few weeks, but I wanted to point it out in case anyone looking for them wishes to watch out for them.

Also, I watched some of TEDxAtlanta live yesterday. All were about the evolution of community. It seemed interesting to me how much music was a part of that.

from Rants, Raves, and Rhetoric v4

TED: All your devices can be hacked

No, a person cannot catch a computer virus. But, as more wireless technology is implanted in people, I can see worse things being done. Given an example was the exact model of a former vice president of the United State’s pacemaker, I can see the Secret Service going into fits figuring out how to prevent anyone from using wireless near anyone they are supposed to protect.

If the above video does not load, then try All your devices can be hacked.

from Rants, Raves, and Rhetoric v4

A Conversation with Ray Bradbury

My favorite quote from the video below.

We should learn from history about the destruction of books. When I was fifteen years old, Hitler burned books in the streets of Berlin. So I learned then how dangerous it all was because if you didn’t have books and the ability to read, then you could not be part of any civilization. You couldn’t be part of a democracy. If you know how to read and you have a complete education about life, then you know how to vote in a democracy. If you do not know how to read, then you do not know how to decide. That is the great thing about our country: we are a democracy of readers and we should keep it that way.

I got here from reading a quote:

Imagination should be the center of your life… Stand at the top of a cliff and jump off and build your wings on the way down.

If the above video does not work, then try A Conversation with Ray Bradbury

from Rants, Raves, and Rhetoric v4

Family Stories

The adult table was the place to be growing up. I knew a story was particularly good when an adult looked at me, looked at my Mom, and my Mom asked me to leave the room AND close the door. I became pretty good at silently listening at that or another door (or the window when I got taller).

Photos are nice, but they are frozen moment in time. The moments leading to the photo, the significance, and how things changed are all not captured. The story does.

My grandmother wrote down her stories at one point, I think around 2003. With my digital point-and-click camera acquired in 2005 being able to take video, I thought about recording her telling them, but she commented on the camera any time I had it out. Then I noticed she stopped commenting about the camera, so when I had her to myself for a week in 2008, I recorded many stories and otherwise just getting her to talk. Occasionally sense, when she was in a talkative mood and my camera was available, I would get more.

Maybe my sibling and cousins will find them interesting.

I definitely need to do the same with my parents.

from Rants, Raves, and Rhetoric v4

TED: The power of introverts

I to really need to pick up Susan Cain’s book Quiet. I watched her talk at Leading@Google a couple weeks ago because I could not find her TED. Not the TED is available.

My family very much was the one where we would hang out together reading. I’ve always been the one to hang back and watch and observe until comfortable. Before I even understood systems, my mind was attempting to reverse engineer them. Only then could I figure out how to use them.

Too bad human behavior is messier than computers.

http://video.ted.com/assets/player/swf/EmbedPlayer.swf

If the above video does not play, then try Susan Cain: The power of introverts.

from Rants, Raves, and Rhetoric v4

Collusion on Firefox

As we browse the Web, our browsers picks up cookies. Many sites will give our browser advertiser’s cookies. More importantly, the advertiser’s servers can look to see whether we have their cookies and where we obtained them. This is how they record our browsing habits. The more places they advertise, the better they are able to track us.

Collusion is an addon for Firefox detects the cookies added to my browser in order to identify the parties tracking me across sites are. For example, I just installed it and visited Google which dropped cookies for doubleclick, rubicon, bluekai, and others. I then went to the New York Times web site which added Nielson, Doubleplex, and other such as doubleclick.

This is going to occupy me for days… Maybe even weeks.

from Rants, Raves, and Rhetoric v4

Weekly Roundup for Mar 2, 2012

from Rants, Raves, and Rhetoric v4